Tag Archives: poetry

I have whiteboard tables, now what…

Last year, I had glass put on my tables to retrofit them into a white board table. Here are some of my favorite activities that we’ve done with them!

Paraphrasing

I know that many teachers struggle with how to articulate paraphrasing as a skill. It’s so easy to say, “don’t copy and paste” and even when we break it down and pretend we are explaining the topic to our lunch table or our parents, it’s a hard skill for students to pick up. What we did was we did a guided research project. We read an article together, and they could add more articles. We took sentences from the article and put them up on the screen.

First: They had to find the fact fragment, or the fact in it’s shortest/simplest form. There may be more than one.

Second: They had to identify words that they wouldn’t traditionally use or would change if they were writing.

Third: Find synonyms for the words they identified.

Finally: Rewrite the sentence in their own words. Use the fact fragment as a starting point. We could add in details we’ve learned about the topic, shift the order, and include our synonyms.

This is something that was a great co-teaching lesson, because the classroom teacher and I could go around and fine tune sentences. Many sentences needed tweaking, and the whiteboard setting prevented students from getting frustrated. We did this activity between the rough draft and final copy and the classroom teachers noticed a significant improvement in the quality of the final copy.  In addition, it was a great tangible activity that we could point to throughout the year whenever the topic of “using your own words” came up.

Planning for maker challenges/stopmotion movies

I feel like this goes without saying. Having whiteboard tables is a great way for them to brainstorm/blueprint. (and sometimes it makes for a great stopmotion medium)

“Take a Fact/Leave a Fact” Poetry introduction

We were practicing using print resources for a poet project. I set up stations with 3 types of print resources. They had to go around to each station and find a fact about a poet and leave it for the next group. Groups could not repeat facts. If they found a cool fact, and it tied into their project, they were free to take it and use it in their project.

Sometime teaching print resources makes me feel like a worksheet queen. This activity got the kids moving, challenged them to find better facts than their classmates, and really got them engaged in each type of resource I was promoting.

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End of Year Assessment

At the end of the year, I did a scavenger hunt to see if they could navigate certain skills successfully in my room. One station was for them to leave me a thing I could improve on in my library. I loved the insight they gave me.

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My favorite bit of feedback from 6th grade!

World Cafe

Social studies classes used this method to cover certain cultures, it’s a great way to document discussions and get kids up and moving around the room. Want to learn about this method, check out this site: http://www.theworldcafe.com/key-concepts-resources/world-cafe-method/

 

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National Poetry Month: Blackout Poetry

Last year, I celebrated National Poetry Month by bringing poetry to lunches for “Poem in your Pocket Day” This year I wanted to add to our celebration.

I gave study hall students a chance to stretch their brain by creating black out poetry. I really enjoy the examples Kwame Alexander uses in “Booked.” I was planning on putting the ebook up on the screen as an example, but as sometimes happens in the world of technology, my projector broke. I was really lucky to have the MackinVia app on my phone and surface and held that up as an example.

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We used weeded books to create our blackout poetry. We started by circling words that described our topic or told a story. The results were incredible! We then put our finished products on our “poet-tree!” These poems were mixed in with actual poet books.

Overall, it was a super easy display to make, while still fun and interactive for our students!

Book Review: Free Verse

Free Verse by Sarah Dooley

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Published by G. P. Putnam and sons in 2016

Sasha has experienced more loss than most 8th graders should. Her mother left her years ago. She and her brother were raised by their father, Ben until a mining accident claimed his life. Then her brother puts off college to raise her until he his killed fighting a fire in a bakery. She is moved in to foster care with a lady named Phyllis. Phyllis is patient as Sasha is dealing with all her trauma. Then Sasha discovers that a cousin of her’s is Phyllis’ neighbor. She befriends the cousin’s son, Mikey.

School is a challenge. Meeting with the guidance councelor, having the school bully watch a meltdown, getting invited to join poetry club (which happens to be run by the school bully), and making a friend on the bus.

Since this book is called “free verse” it would be a let down for it not to have poetry in it. The third section is told in poetry as Sasha explores different formats. She also uses it as a coping mechanism when trauma makes speaking too much to bear. These poems are beautiful and move the story along smoothly.

Sasha has a tendancy to run. When an accident causes them to no know if Mikey’s dad is alive or dead, she decides to take Mikey with her. She gets a few towns over, until she’s picked up by the cops, but Mikey stays on the run. Will Mikey be found? Will Sasha have a family that will stay?

This book does a good job of being realistic and making each character 3 dimensional. They are responsive to trauma in their situations. Almost everyone that Sasha gets to know has a backstory and a reason/motivation for their actions. In this polarizing time, this book does a good job of imaging a part of the country complexly without being patronizing or focused on a handful of issues. Mining accidents are mentioned multiple time in this book, but Sasha points out that miners are people with lives outside of work. They are parents, artists, adventurers, and many other things. Huebert, Sasha’s cousin mentions the “smarts” that are necessary to work the incredibly delicate/dangerous machinery involved in mining.

FTC disclosure. I recieved this book from the publisher, I recieved no monetary compensation for this review.

Quotes.

“Wake me…Before you go running off again…just wake me. Then if you run, I’ll run with you.” (p. 69)

“It’s like haiku opened a door inside me that I’m trying with all my might to shove closed again.” (p. 98)

“You can’t understand what makes a good story if you’ve never starred in one, or at least been a particularly memorable (sometimes tragic) supporting character.” (p. 258)

“I’m secretly awful.” (p. 264)

 

Poem in your Pocket Day

I’ve been looking at a lot of public libraries that do “passive programming” lately. Basically, it’s an event or an activity that is put out on a table and people can make something, do something , or learn something at their own pace.

Since it’s testing season, I’m all about celebrating the little things. “Poem in your Pocket” day is a day that celebrates the inspiration power of poetry.

Working with teachers, I gathered a bunch of poems and put them on lunch tables. Students could read the poem, and if they wanted to be entered into a raffle, they could stop by the library and tell me about it. By the end of the school day, I already had a healthy number of raffles in my box!

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I had lunch duty during 1st lunch and I was amazed with how well this simple program went. Students were confused about why there were papers on their lunch tables. Once they realized that they were poems, they read them, made some comments with to each other and pulled me over to ask questions. It was a nice change of pace for a testing day! The other teachers with lunch duty remarked that they had the same reactions from students.

Here’s where I found our poems:

  • Teacher recommendations
  • Poems to Learn by Heart compiled by Caroline Kennedy
  • The Library of Congress’ Poetry 180