Tag Archives: ebooks

Reflections: Year 1 of using ebooks

I know I’m a tech savvy librarian, but ebooks scare the living daylights out of me. There’s something about the terror of hosting costs, legal issues with how long you own the books (multi-user, can I download it, can I print pages?), and the feeling of diving into the unknown with someone else’s money. I’m easily overwhelmed by the thought of taking a leap into the ebook fray and investing in something that my student may not use.

For this reason, I avoided the ebook question for my first few years. At the time, I didn’t think my population was interested and more importantly, I didn’t know how to take the leap in a way that my population would respond to it. Then the PA ebook consortium idea appeared. I was cautiously optimistic as I tried to learn more.

As I did research, I was really happy with what the organizers of the ebook consortium and Mackin were offering.

  • No Hosting Fees
  • You had the purchasing power of the whole state
  • Focus on fiction/high interest titles
  • Mackin allows you to keep the books you purchase
  • They were asking for librarian input
  • Google Single Sign on

Now, it took a few months to get going but I did some heavy promoting of the ebook through various scavenger hunts and hyperdocs. We’ll see how the program progresses, but I’m optimistic. We’ve gotten several teachers onboard, promoted to students, and found a way to embed these resources in our lessons. I’ve been happy with the usage and how easy it is for students to access the ebooks. I can’t wait to try a few ideas for next year!

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National Poetry Month: Blackout Poetry

Last year, I celebrated National Poetry Month by bringing poetry to lunches for “Poem in your Pocket Day” This year I wanted to add to our celebration.

I gave study hall students a chance to stretch their brain by creating black out poetry. I really enjoy the examples Kwame Alexander uses in “Booked.” I was planning on putting the ebook up on the screen as an example, but as sometimes happens in the world of technology, my projector broke. I was really lucky to have the MackinVia app on my phone and surface and held that up as an example.

poetry.PNG

We used weeded books to create our blackout poetry. We started by circling words that described our topic or told a story. The results were incredible! We then put our finished products on our “poet-tree!” These poems were mixed in with actual poet books.

Overall, it was a super easy display to make, while still fun and interactive for our students!