Tech Review: Thinglink

Thinglink is a tech tool that my inner librarian loves! Who doesn’t love the idea of embedding information inside images, it’s all the fun of digital libraries and metadata without having to know how to catalog. (yes, my geek flag is waving high).  Also, it allows us to create a polished interactive poster that doesn’t look tacky (unlike glogster…don’t hate me).

thinglinkforteachers.png

I’ve used it for a variety of projects over the past two years. With our Social Studies classes, we’ve made Africa thinglinks on regions of Africa. Our 6th grade science classes embedded different types of clouds in a sky with descriptions of each type of cloud.  With our learning support classes, we’ve created thinglinks about simple machines and states. I’m amazed how much the students enjoy
creating them.

I like that since the students are embedding information in an image, they have to reflect and decide what image would be the best to create. Then they can begin curating websites that would be good to link onto the main image. I’ve found it’s best to give them a checklist for different types of media (websites, images, youtube videos, facts with no media).

There are a few disadvantages to thinglink. When students insert a website, it autogenerates a description. If you’re a teacher creating a webquest, you are normally able to adjust the descriptions to go along with your activity. If you are a student, they have a tendency to leave the computer generated description and that shows a lack of effort and creativity. I know I had the really remind my kids about adjusting the description. The free version doesn’t let you insert pictures easily anymore (it’s possible, but sometimes not worth the effort).

Right now I am taking a class on making hyperdocs. My mind always wraps around how students can make things, but it didn’t occur to me to use this tool as a launchpad for webquests, multimedia text sets, and other activities. It’s been interesting to brainstorm other applications for this tool. I’ve also been looking at thinglinks made by others to see if I can use them in my instruction. There’s a lot of potential in this, and I’m excited to see how it develops as a resource for educators.

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